Apr 11, 2021  
2020-2021 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Undergraduate Catalog

Courses


 

Adaptive Physical Education

  
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    HPE 485 Supervised Experience in Therapeutic Clinical Settings-III (1)


    Fall, Spring, Summer
    Prerequisite: HPE 385  and Junior status
    This course is a precursor to clinical internship in a continuation of opportunities for students to gain practical experience by working in areas of professional interest under certified practitioners. A minimum of 175 clock hours of practical experience is required.
  
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    HPE 490 Methods of Teaching Allied Health Sciences (3)


    Fall
    Prerequisite: Open to Juniors and Seniors only
    A course designed to provide the student with the basic methodology of how learning takes place through motor skills, and the various techniques and assessments procedures used in teaching motor activities in schools, recreation, and kinesiotherapy settings.
  
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    HPE 491 Clinical Internship in Exercise Science (3)


    Fall, Spring/Day
    This capstone course requires students to complete a 300 hour internship which will provide students the opportunity to apply exercise science knowledge in a professional setting. Professionals will supervise students for a twelve-week internship where students will work with clientele to establish fitness goals, construct detailed workout plans, and assist clients in completing their activities.
  
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    HPE 492 Research and Seminar in Allied Health and Kinesiotherapy (3)


    Spring
    Prerequisites: ENG 113  and Junior or Senior status
    Designed primarily for majors in non-teaching health sciences areas, this course discusses and researches critical issues in kinesiotherapy, occupational therapy, physical therapy, and related health science topics.
  
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    HPE 493 Clinical Internship in Kinesiotherapy (6-12)


    Fall, Spring, Summer
    Prerequisite: HPE 485  and Senior status
    Upon completion of all required coursework, the student is assigned to a therapeutic agency specifically related to the student’s major area of concentration. This 16-week internship is the culmination of a minimum 1,000 clock-hour requirement of supervised clinical experiences for a major in adapted physical education and kinesiotherapy. Given the prior supervised experiences (HPE 285 , HPE 385 , HPE 485 ), the internship clock-hour requirement should result in no more than 600 clock-hours. Students must provide their own transportation to and from the placement site.

International Relations

  
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    INT 121 Introduction to World Politics (3)


    A prerequisite to many higher-level international courses. This course has three purposes: to survey world politics since World War II, to introduce the basic concepts underlying the behavior of nations, and to analyze the world events that are reported in the headlines today. Group discussions help students develop an in-depth understanding of world events.
  
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    INT 226 Contemporary Middle East and North Africa (3)


    Prerequisite: INT 121  
    A study of the politics of Middle East and North Africa since World War I, with special analysis and discussion of such topics as the Palestinian/Israeli Question, Iran, the Gulf War and the Algerian crisis. The strategic and economic importance of the area and American national interest there are also discussed.
  
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    INT 252 International Relations (3)


    Prerequisite: INT 121  
    A thorough analysis of the concepts and theories underlying the behavior of nations and an analysis and examination of international politics, especially contemporary issues and problems. This course also provides a strong foundation in research, with special emphasis on research techniques and sources in the field of International Relations.
  
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    INT 372 Contemporary Africa (3)


    Prerequisites: INT 121  and INT 252  
    A study of African politics from colonial times to the present. Emphasis is placed on the struggles for independence, the establishment of states, the prospects for political development, and the international relations of African states.
  
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    INT 390 International Political Economy (3)


    Prerequisites: POL 150  or POL 201  
    An exploration of the interplay of economics and politics in the international arena, with greater emphasis on the post-Cold War developments. Special attention is given to the issues of the international economic system and theories of economic development
  
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    INT 411 U.S. Foreign Policy (3)


    Prerequisites: INT 121  and 6 hours in International Relations or International Business
    Exploration of U.S. foreign policy since World War II, discussing the Cold War but giving special attention to the post-Cold War period. The course examines, in depth, the goals of U.S. foreign policy and the domestic factors that influence its course and process. Through group discussions and presentations, students develop their own views on the direction of U.S. foreign policy.

Mathematics

  
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    MAT 111 General Mathematics - I (3)


    This is a University Core course in mathematics for non-science majors, designed to develop skills and ability to reason and to master basic algebraic manipulations. The topics include set theory, symbolic logic, and basic algebra.

    This is a University Core Course in Mathematics taken by Freshmen. The students in this course are introduced to functions, graphs, linear inequalities, matrices, linear programming, the metric system, geometry. The students are trained in critical thinking and problem solving skills to be applied to real world situations. Like mortgage, credit card interests and other topics. This course is the second of a three- sequence study in college mathematics.

  
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    MAT 112 General Mathematics - II (3)


    Prerequisite: MAT 111  or Placement Test
    This is a University Core course in mathematics for non-science majors, that is a continued study of beginning algebra, statistics and applications. The topics include solving linear, quadratic equations, systems of equations, graphing functions, probability, elementary statistics, areas and volumes of simple plane figures and solids and applications, and consumer mathematics.

    This is a University Core Course in Mathematics taken by Freshmen. Students in this course are expected to have successfully completed or placed out of MAT 111 . The students in this course are introduced to topics on set theory and logic, probability, statistics, and applications. The students are trained in critical thinking and problem solving skills to be applied to real world situations. This course is the third of a three-sequence study in college mathematics.

  
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    MAT 113 Intermediate Algebra (3)


    Prerequisite: none or Placement Test
    This is a reinforcement of algebraic manipulations with topics including polynomials, factoring polynomials, and solving linear, quadratic equations, and systems of equations, and introduction to the concept of functions and graphs of linear, quadratic and polynomial functions.
  
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    MAT 115 Precalculus (4)


    Prerequisite: MAT 113  or Placement Test
    This course integrates the traditional algebraic and trigonometric topics into the study of functions and graphs, utilizing graphing technology. Topics included are polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. Emphasis is placed on using available technology as a tool in exploring functions and in problem solving.
  
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    MAT 120 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I (3)


    This course prepares STEM-focused elementary teachers by investigating numeration systems and algebraic reasoning. A thorough examination of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division reveals why these operations behave the way they do and what interconnections exist between these operations. The counting numbers are extended to include negative numbers and the study of integer operation. Integer understanding is then expanded to rational numbers by examining fractions and the arithmetic of fractions at a deep level.  In addition, the course addresses application of number theory including the study of primes, divisibility, the LCM and GCF. Finally, the course arithmetic to algebraic expressions and linear functions. This course sequence is intended to prepare students for formal admission to the Department of Education.

  
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    MAT 121 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers II (3)


    MAT 120  
    This course prepares STEM-focused elementary teachers by investigating functions, geometry, statistics and probability. This course begins with an investigation of functions with geometric applications.  The study of geometry begins with examination of the basic shapes of one, two, and three dimensions and is followed by an investigation of the basic ways these shapes can be transformed: translation, reflection, and rotation.  The study of basic measurement including length, area, surface area, and volume.  Next an examination from ratios, rates, and proportions, leads to an understanding of percentages, uncertainty, and chance.  This is followed by the study of basic statistics emphasizing measures of central tendency, variance, and ways of organizing data completes the content of this course. This course sequence is intended to prepare students for formal admission to the Department of Education.
  
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    MAT 200 Introduction to Statistics (3)


    Prerequisite: MAT 115  
    This is an introduction to basic probability and statistics concepts with particular reference to biological data. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability distributions, estimating, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, correlation, and regression. A statistical package like MIMITAB or graphing calculators, will be integrated into the course.
  
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    MAT 201 Calculus-I (4)


    Prerequisite: MAT 115  or Placement test
    This is the first of a sequence of three calculus courses. Topics include functions, limits, derivatives and applications, and definite and indefinite integrals.
  
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    MAT 202 Calculus-II (4)


    Prerequisite: MAT 201  
    This is a study of applications of definite integrals, calculus of transcendental functions, techniques of integration, sequences, infinite series, plane curves, conic sections, and polar coordinates.
  
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    MAT 203 Calculus-III (4)


    Prerequisite: MAT 202  
    A study of vectors, algebra and calculus of vectors, analytical geometry in 2 and 3 dimensions, vector valued functions and their derivatives and integrals, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, and applications of derivatives of functions of several variables.
  
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    MAT 212 Discrete Mathematics (3)


    Prerequisite: MAT 201  
    A study of combinatory, networking, digraphs and applications. This is a required course for Computer Science students.
  
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    MAT 215 Introduction to Abstract Math (3)


    MAT 115  
    This is a course intended for freshman or sophomore mathematics majors. Topics covered include a rigorous look at logical statements, basic proof techniques, sets, and functions.
  
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    MAT 219 PRAXIS Seminar IV: Mathematics (1)


    (Only if indicated by Diagnostic Exam Scores)
    This seminar and lab provides the student with a comprehensive diagnostic review and practice of mathematics materials contained in the PRAXIS I exam series. Topics include mathematical literacy, terminology, symbolic notation, logical reasoning, and reading with comprehension of mathematics.
  
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    MAT 232 Theory of Numbers (3)


    Prerequisite: MAT 202  or Instructor’s permission
    Study of elementary properties of integers, prime and composite numbers. Topics also include Euclidean Algorithm, congruencies, Diophantine equations, Chinese Remainder Theorem, Fermat’s and Wilson’s theorems. This is the first abstract course that involves theorems and proof techniques.
  
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    MAT 311 Modern Algebra (3)


    Prerequisite: MAT 232  
    An abstract mathematics course that students learn how to prove theorems and use definitions. Topics include algebraic structures such as groups, rings, fields, their sub and quotient structures and homomorphism.
  
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    MAT 312 Linear Algebra (3)


    Prerequisite: MAT 115  or Instructor’s permission
    A study of matrices, systems of equations, vectors, vector spaces, linear dependence and independence of vectors, bases, dimension of vector spaces, and linear transformations. Applications to real world problems, using matrices, Marcov chain, Leontief economic models, are also studied.
  
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    MAT 313 Probability and Statistics (3)


    Prerequisite: MAT 202  
    A study of probability spaces, random variables, random sampling, estimation of parameters, and testing hypotheses.
  
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    MAT 323 Modern Geometry (3)


    Prerequisites: MAT 232  and MAT 312  
    A study of Mathematical logic, historic development of Euclidean and Non-Euclidean geometry, Euclid’s postulates, axiomatic systems, transformation geometry, vectors, and projective geometry.
  
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    MAT 360 Teaching Mathematics with Technology (3)


    This course is designed for college students in the Mathematics Education Program. This course prepares teacher candidates in the appropriate use of mathematical tools and manipulatives, appropriate use of technology (e.g. graphing calculators, computer algebra systems, dynamic drawing tools, spreadsheets, or statistical graphing software) to explore algebraic, geometric and data analysis concepts. Students learn how to use various technology software and hardware, choose the appropriate technology software to teach various mathematical concepts, the ethical use of technology in the high school environment, and how to develop, deliver, and teach mathematical content, using technology.
  
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    MAT 411 Differential Equations (3)


    Prerequisite: MAT 203  
    A study of ordinary differential equations and their solutions, numerical methods of solution, Laplace Transform, Power series solutions, and systems of equations. Also various applications in Physics, engineering, and mechanics are studied.

Mass Communications

  
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    COM 305 Communication and Conflict 3


    COM 205  or COM 210  
    This course provides centering theories and strategies to help students develop a lifestyle of peace based upon right thought, right heart and right action. Lessons of the course demonstrate that the commo denominator in conflict that individuals experience is self while providing remedies for transforming personal and social conflict. Students will engage in intrapersonal, interpersonal and group conflict meditation workshops and oral communication projects while gaining experience with social activist and professionals in a variety of fields.
  
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    MCO 175 Supervised Media Training (1)


  
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    MCO 176 Supervised Media Training (1)


  
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    MCO 201 Introduction to Mass Media (3)


    This course is a prerequisite or corequisite for all other MCO courses. (ENG 110  - ENG 111  (Grade C or Better))
    Introduction to the principles, philosophies, policies and practices of mass media industries, including print, broadcast, internet and new media communications, and allied professions of advertising and public relations. Attention is also given to historical perspectives, regulations, global implications and change.
  
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    MCO 210 Reporting & Writing (3)


    Prerequisites: ENG 112  (Grade C or Better) & MCO 201  
    An introduction to the basic principles of the journalism profession. Emphasis is given to journalistic writing for the media in terms of style, structure, comprehension, and readability. Examines the fundamentals of newsgathering, news writing, interviewing, research, news judgment, and deadline pressures.
  
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    MCO 222 Audio Production I (3)


    Prerequisite: MCO 201  
    An introduction to the techniques and procedures in the creation, production and direction of radio programs. It is designed to introduce students to basic knowledge and technical skills students need to understand various aspects of announcing such as articulation, voice projection, posture, and studio performance in various radio and television announcing situations. Emphasis will be placed on laboratory and technical experiences.
  
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    MCO 223 Video Production and Theory (3)


    Prerequisite: MCO 201  
    This is an introductory course geared to the specialization of basic video production with an emphasis on field, studio and film production. This course will prepare students for the pre-production phase of all video projects. By taking this course, students will learn how to bring their projects to life from storyboarding, set design, planning for props, location scouting and working with talent. Through this experience, students will understand camera motion techniques, production theories, and basic video editing construction.
  
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    MCO 231 Multimedia Convergence (3)


    Prerequisites: MCO 222  & MCO 223  
    An introduction to the principles, philosophies, and industries of new media in terms of user generated content, online expression, social networking, identity management, community building, and citizen journalism. The course will focus on applying new media landscape principles through the incorporation of various multimedia elements, photos, sound, video, and text.
  
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    MCO 250 History of Journalism and Mass Communications (3)


    Prerequisite: ENG 112  
    Course is designed to address the development of mass media from the colonization of America to present-day. The interrelationships between print media and American social, cultural, economic and political issues are explored, with some examination of how theses interrelationships influenced the development of twentieth century non-print media.
  
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    MCO 275 Supervised Media Training (1)


  
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    MCO 276 Supervised Media Training (1)


  
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    MCO 312 Communication Theory and Research (3)


    Prerequisite: MCO 320  
    Study of the methods, techniques, and measuring instruments currently used in the analysis of historical and contemporary communication theories.
  
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    MCO 320 Media Writing (3)


    Prerequisites: MCO 210 , MCO 222 , and MCO 223  
    This course is designed to refine various writing skills as learned in MCO 210 , MCO 222 , and MCO 223  through an integrated approach which emphasizes the fundamental writing skills required by all media - print, broadcast, internet and new media communications, advertising, and public relations. Application of different media formats, particularly in electronic and multimedia journalism, will culminate in an integrated journalism media portfolio.
  
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    MCO 325 Mass Media Law (3)


    Prerequisites: POL 201 , MCO 320  
    Study of laws, rules, and regulations governing mass media industries in the United States. Emphasis on understanding and analyzing the legal, economic, professional, and ethical principles when gathering, reporting, editing and publishing information.
  
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    MCO 326 Television and Video Production (3)


    Prerequisite: MCO 223  
    Application of principles learned in MCO 223  with course focus on studio production and field production. Students will gain experience in professional studio production and learn field production skills including camera set-up, lighting issues, and audio. Work will include public affairs show and a group documentary video project.
  
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    MCO 329 Audio Production II (3)


    Prerequisite: MCO 222  
    Advanced study of the process of studio and commercial recording radio broadcasts through an examination of the principles of tape or CD recording and digital editing. It is designed to help students master the advance knowledge and technical skills of various aspects of announcing such as articulation, voice projection, posture, and studio performance in various radio and television announcing situations. Participation is in extensive commercial and studio recording projects is required. Emphasis will be placed on advance laboratory and technical experiences.
  
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    MCO 331 Web and Desktop Design (3)


    Prerequisite: Junior status
    This course addresses interactive, emerging digital media. Medium to advance skills associated with publishing content in a variety of digital environments will be learned and applied by students taking this course. Particular focus is paid to graphic, work processing, layout software applications, and the principles and technologies of advanced web development.
  
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    MCO 341 Multicultural Media (3)


    Prerequisite: Junior status
    This course examines media portrayals of race, gender, and class in U.S. media. Using a historical and sociocultural lens students will study, analyzes and critically discuss media representations of various cultures and audience impact. Focus will also include media diversity as it relates to media policy, literacy, activism and advocacy.
  
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    MCO 350 Public Relations Writing (3)


    Prerequisite: ENG 112  
    This course is designed to instruct students on how to design a full media kit and fully diagnose the public relations theories, strategies and practices that regulate the field. This course combines theoretical approach with practical, hands-on tasks.
  
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    MCO 363 Broadcast Announcing (3)


    Prerequisite: MCO 222 , Junior status
    Training in articulation, voice projection, modulation, and quality, along with studio performance applied to radio and television news, sports, commercial, and music announcing. Emphasis is placed on laboratory experiences.
  
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    MCO 375 Supervised Media Training (1)


  
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    MCO 376 Supervised Media Training (1)


  
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    MCO 415 Film Criticism (3)


    Prerequisite: MCO 223  
    This course will expose students to the fundamentals of film studies. Students will review films including Hollywood, African-American, International, and Third World Cinema weekly from the early 1900s through present day to examine the nature of filmmaking’s social and psychological role in society. Students will also learn about narrative filmmaking through critical analysis of theories in structuralism, auteurism, ideological criticism and spectatorship.
  
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    MCO 421 Advanced Practicum (Capstone) (3)


    Prerequisites: MCO 320  and MCO 326  or MCO 329  
    Application of principles learned in advanced courses MCO 320  and 327 or MCO 329  to an actual professional situation. Students are placed with the student newspaper or a local media organization to gain hands-on experience. Graduation portfolio must be produced.
  
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    MCO 423 Film Production (3)


    Prerequisite: MCO 326  
    This course is an introduction to the art of filmmaking. Training and hands-on experience in short film writing, producing, directing and editing. Advanced study and application of the three stages of production: pre-production, production and post-production.
  
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    MCO 431 Feature Writing (3)


    Prerequisite: MCO 320 , Junior status
    This course is designed to provide a seminar-style opportunity to build an individual writing style and voice and to enjoy the “art” of writing. Students will be exposed to best practices and techniques in feature writing to specific audiences, and aim to be published as well as explore other feature writing submission opportunities, prizes and foundations.
  
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    MCO 435 Media Management (3)


    Prerequisite: Junior status
    This course focuses on the principles of radio and television management, including economic, administrative, and organizational structures and procedures. Emphasis on the role that broadcasting has assumed in society and examination of the various relationships within industry segments and their functions. Students will gain the knowledge necessary to reinforce their understanding of major policies and issues within the market structure, telecommunications and regulation of the communications industry.
  
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    MCO 450 Digital Storytelling (3)


    Prerequisite: MCO 231  
    Corequisite: MCO 331  
    An introduction to the principles, of digital storytelling and media that will immerse students in the technologies and aesthetics necessary for digital communication across a wide spectrum of media and platforms. Subject areas include digital photography, videography and sound.
  
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    MCO 460 Social Media (3)


    Prerequisites: MCO 231  and MCO 331  
    This course introduces students to new communication technology and its newfound influence on society. The course will focus on examining new media tools and providing a hands-on approach.  Technologies such as computer-mediated communication, social networking, blogging, media analytics, and research/fact-checking will be explored.  Students will also be taught proper communication etiquette for using social media.

     

  
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    MCO 475 Supervised Media Training (1)


    Prerequisites: GPA 2.5 or better
    Course is designed to introduce practical skills pertaining to the media platforms afforded by the department area: Video Production, Newspaper, Yearbook, and Radio. As part of the course, students are required to complete 60 hours under the supervision of a journalism and mass communications professional as assigned by the department chair of the Mass Communications Program.
  
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    MCO 476 Supervised Media Training (1)


  
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    MCO 481 Mass Communications Seminar (3)


    Prerequisite: Advanced Student Status and Permission of Instructor
    Topics Rotate
  
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    MCO 485 Internship in Communication (3-6)


    Prerequisite: Advanced Student Status and Permission of Instructor
    A practicum course that allows students to combine classroom theories with hands-on experience in an off-campus facility.
  
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    MCO 486 Internship in Communication (3-6)


    Prerequisite: Advanced Student Status and Permission of Instructor
    A practicum course that allows students to combine classroom theories with hands-on experience in an off-campus facility.

Interdisciplinary Studies

  
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    MDS 216 Classics and Contemporaries (3)


    Interdisciplinary readings, discussion, and writing in the liberal arts and sciences. Current issues, problems, and opportunities are clarified through reference to ideas, values, and the arts of the past and present.
  
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    MDS 360 Special Topic in Liberal Studies (3)


    Prerequisite: ENG 113  or the equivalent
    Study of a particular topic that warrants interdisciplinary study. The topic will be announced prior to the registration period. Students may repeat the course, but not the topic, for academic credit
  
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    MDS 418 Senior Seminar in Liberal Studies (3)


    Prerequisite: MDS 216  and senior status in Liberal Studies or consent of the instructor
    A supportive workshop in which each senior does an interdisciplinary project using methodologies of two or more chosen fields. Includes a unit in which the student develops a postgraduate education/career plan.

Military Science

  
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    MIS 101 Leadership and Personal Development (1)


    MIS 101 introduces Cadets to the personal challenges and competencies that are critical for effective leadership. Cadets learn how the personal development of life skills such as critical thinking, goal setting, time management, physical fitness, and stress management relate to leadership, officership, and the Army profession. The focus is on developing basic knowledge and comprehension of Army leadership dimensions while gaining a big picture understanding of the ROTC program, its purpose in the Army, and its advantages for the student. No prerequisite $ 25 fee attached.
  
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    MIS 102 Introduction to Tactical Leadership (1)


    MIS 102 overviews leadership fundamentals such as setting direction, problemsolving, listening, presenting briefs, providing feedback, and using effective writing skills. Cadets explore dimensions of leadership values, attributes, skills, and actions in the context of practical, hands-on, and interactive exercises. Continued emphasis is placed on recruitment and retention of Cadets. Cadre role models and the building of stronger relationships among the Cadets through common experience and practical interaction are critical aspects of the MSL 102 experience. No prerequisite $ 25 fee attached.
  
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    MIS 111 Leadership Laboratory (0)


    Open only to (and required of) students in the associated Military Science course series, with different roles for students at different levels in the program; learn and practice basic skills; gain insight into Advanced course in order to make an informed decision; and build self-confidence and teambuilding leadership skills that can be applied throughout life.
  
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    MIS 112 Leadership Laboratory (0)


    Open only to (and required of) students in the associated Military Science course series, with different roles for students at different levels in the program; learn and practice basic skills; gain insight into Advanced course in order to make an informed decision; and build self-confidence and teambuilding leadership skills that can be applied throughout life.
  
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    MIS 118 ROTC SWIMMING (1)


    All Cadets will be given swimming instructions from a certified instructor. At the completion of the course Cadets will be able to swim for 10 minutes continuous using any combination of four strokes (breast, side, crawl, back) and after ten minutes of rest 5 minutes of treading water. There is no associated distance with this requirement. Cadet will also be taught Combat Water Survival Test (CWST) which will be administered at LDAC. The CWST consists of a 15 meter Swim with a M-16, wearing ACUs, tennis shoes, and LBE , a 3 meter drop - walk off a 3 meter diving board blindfolded with weapon and LBE, enter the water and remove blindfold, swim to side of pool without losing weapon and Equipment removal - Enter water and discard weapon and LBE. Swim to side of pool. This is a commissioning requirement and either a swim test (credit) or the class is mandatory.
  
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    MIS 201 Innovative Team Leadership (2)


    MIS 201 explores the dimensions of creative and innovative tactical leadership strategies and styles by examining team dynamics and two historical leadership theories that form the basis of the Army leadership framework (trait and behavior theories). Cadets practice aspects of personal motivation and team building in the context of planning, executing, and assessing team exercises and participating in leadership labs. Focus is on continued development of the knowledge of leadership values and attributes through an understanding of Army rank, structure, and duties and basic aspects of land navigation and squad tactics. Case studies provide tangible context for learning the Soldier’s Creed and Warrior Ethos as they apply in the contemporary operating environment (COE). No prerequisite $ 25 fee attached.
  
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    MIS 202 Foundations of Tactical Leadership (2)


    MIS 202 examines the challenges of leading tactical teams in the complex contemporary operating environment (COE). The course highlights dimensions of terrain analysis, patrolling, and operation orders. Further study of the theoretical basis of the Army leadership framework explores the dynamics of adaptive leadership in the context of military operations. MIS 202 provides a smooth transition into MIS 301 . Cadets develop greater self awareness as they assess their own leadership styles and practice communication and team building skills. COE case studies give insight into the importance and practice of teamwork and tactics in real-world scenarios. No prerequisite $ 25 fee attached.
  
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    MIS 210 Leadership Training Course (6)


    A six-week summer camp conducted at an Army post. The student receives pay. (Travel, lodging and most meals are covered by the Army.) The environment is rigorous, and is similar to Army Basic Training. No military obligation incurred. Open only to students who have not taken all four of MIS 101 , MIS 102 , MIS 201  and MIS 202 , and who pass a physical examination (paid for by ROTC). Completion of MIS 210 qualifies a student for entry into the Advanced Course. Candidates can apply for a space any time during the school year prior to the summer. Space is limited.
  
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    MIS 211 Leadership Laboratory (0)


    Open only to (and required of) students in the associated Military Science course series, with different roles for students at different levels in the program; learn and practice basic skills; gain insight into Advanced course in order to make an informed decision; and build self-confidence and teambuilding leadership skills that can be applied throughout life.
  
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    MIS 212 Leadership Laboratory (0)


    Open only to (and required of) students in the associated Military Science course series, with different roles for students at different levels in the program; learn and practice basic skills; gain insight into Advanced course in order to make an informed decision; and build self-confidence and teambuilding leadership skills that can be applied throughout life.
  
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    MIS 301 Adaptive Tactical Leadership (3)


    MIS 301 challenges Cadets to study, practice, and evaluate adaptive leadership skills as they are presented with challenging scenarios related to squad tactical operations. Cadets receive systematic and specific feedback on their leadership attributes and actions. Based on such feedback, as well as their own self-evaluations, Cadets continue to develop their leadership and critical thinking abilities. The focus is developing Cadets’ tactical leadership abilities to enable them to succeed at ROTC’s summer Leader Development and Assessment Course (LDAC).
  
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    MIS 302 Leadership In Changing Environments (3)


    MIS 302 uses increasingly intense situational leadership challenges to build Cadet awareness and skills in leading tactical operations up to platoon level. Cadets review aspects of combat, stability, and support operations. They also conduct military briefings and develop proficiency in garrison operation orders. The focus is on exploring, evaluating, and developing skills in decision-making, persuading, and motivating team members in the contemporary operating environment (COE). MSL 302 Cadets are evaluated on what they know and do as leaders as they prepare to attend the ROTC summer Leader Development and Assessment Course (LDAC).
  
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    MIS 310 National Advanced Leadership Camp (6)


    Prerequisites: MIS 301  and MIS 302 .
    A five-week camp conducted at an Army post. Only open to (and required of) students who have completed MIS 301  and MIS 302 . The student receives pay. Travel, lodging and the U.S. Army defrays most meal costs. The Advanced Camp environment is highly structured and demanding, stressing leadership at small unit levels under varying, challenging conditions. Individual leadership and basic skills performance are evaluated throughout the camp. Although this course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis only, the leadership and skills evaluations at the camp weigh heavily in the subsequent selection process that determines the type commission and job opportunities given to the student upon graduation from ROTC and the University. Cadets will put into practice the leadership, tactical and Soldier skills learned in the classroom and lab.
  
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    MIS 311 Advanced Course Leadership Laboratories (0)


    Open only to students in the associated Military Science course. Series, with different roles for students at different levels in the program. Involves leadership responsibilities for the planning, coordination, execution and evaluation of various training and activities with Basic Course students and for the ROTC program as a whole. Students develop, practice and refine leadership skills by serving and being evaluated in a variety of responsible positions.
  
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    MIS 312 Advanced Course Leadership Laboratories (0)


    Open only to students in the associated Military Science course. Series, with different roles for students at different levels in the program. Involves leadership responsibilities for the planning, coordination, execution and evaluation of various training and activities with Basic Course students and for the ROTC program as a whole. Students develop, practice and refine leadership skills by serving and being evaluated in a variety of responsible positions.
  
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    MIS 401 Developing Adaptive Leaders (3)


    MIS 401 develops Cadet proficiency in planning, executing, and assessing complex operations, functioning as a member of a staff, and providing performance feedback to subordinates. Cadets assess risk, make ethical decisions, and lead fellow ROTC Cadets. Lessons on military justice and personnel processes prepare Cadets to make the transition to Army officers. MSL IV Cadets analyze, evaluate, and instruct Cadets at lower levels. Both their classroom and battalion leadership experiences are designed to prepare MSL 401 Cadets for their first unit of assignment. They identify responsibilities of key staff, coordinate staff roles, and use situational opportunities to teach, train, and develop subordinates.
  
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    MIS 402 Officership/Leadership In a Complex World (3)


    MIS 402 explores the dynamics of leading in the complex situations of current military operations in the contemporary operating environment (COE). Cadets examine differences in customs and courtesies, military law, principles of war, and rules of engagement in the face of international terrorism. They also explore aspects of interacting with non-government organizations, civilians on the battlefield, and host nation support. The course places significant emphasis on preparing Cadets for their first unit of assignment. It uses case studies, scenarios, and “What Now, Lieutenant?” exercises to prepare Cadets to face the complex ethical and practical demands of leading as commissioned officers in the United States Army.
  
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    MIS 411 Advanced Course Leadership Laboratories (0)


    Open only to students in the associated Military Science course. Series, with different roles for students at different levels in the program. Involves leadership responsibilities for the planning, coordination, execution and evaluation of various training and activities with Basic Course students and for the ROTC program as a whole. Students develop, practice and refine leadership skills by serving and being evaluated in a variety of responsible positions.
  
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    MIS 412 Advanced Course Leadership Laboratories (0)


    Open only to students in the associated Military Science course. Series, with different roles for students at different levels in the program. Involves leadership responsibilities for the planning, coordination, execution and evaluation of various training and activities with Basic Course students and for the ROTC program as a whole. Students develop, practice and refine leadership skills by serving and being evaluated in a variety of responsible positions.
  
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    MIS 432 Survey of Military History (3)


    A performance-based information program designed to examine the lessons of history and apply the lessons to the treatment of contemporary military problems. This objective is accomplished by presenting students an historic survey of warfare and the relationship between the Soldier and the state. REQUIRED FOR COMMISSIONING. Students on track to commission are highly encouraged to complete this course in the Junior year at the latest.

Music

  
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    MUS 100 Elements of Music (3)


    Focus on the rudiments of music notation, scales and structure, and the reading and understanding of music.
  
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    MUS 101 Applied Music Voice (1)


    Individual instruction in voice. Lab: Performance Seminar. Fee: $150
  
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    MUS 102 Applied Music Voice (1)


    Individual instruction in voice. Lab: Performance Seminar. Fee: $150
  
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    MUS 103 Class Voice (1)


    Study of basic principles of vocal production, to include acquaintance with a variety of solo literature and the development of poise and stage deportment.
  
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    MUS 104 Italian and Latin Diction for Singers (2)


    Study of the International Phonetic Alphabet and its application to the pronunciation of Italian and ecclesiastical Latin and special problems involved in singing these languages.
  
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    MUS 105 English Diction for Singers (2)


    International Phonetic Alphabet and its application to the pronunciation of English and special problems involved in singing in English.
  
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    MUS 106 Voice Class (1)


    Continuation of the study of principles of vocal production, to include acquaintance with a variety of solo literature and the development of poise and stage deportment.
  
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    MUS 111 Applied Music Woodwinds (1)


    Individual instruction in woodwinds. Lab: Performance Seminar. Fee: $150
  
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    MUS 112 Applied Music Woodwinds (1)


    Individual instruction in woodwinds. Lab: Performance Seminar. Fee: $150
  
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    MUS 113 Theory I (4)


    An introduction to the harmonic practice of Western European music from the eighteen and nineteenth centuries. The course includes exercises in part writing, sight singing, keyboard harmony, and ear training.
  
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    MUS 114 Theory II (4)


    Continuation of four-part writing procedures, including borrowed chords and secondary sevenths, suitable ear training, sight singing, and keyboard assignments.
  
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    MUS 115 University Choir (1)


    Open to all students who sing. Opportunities are provided for the study and performance of music covering many periods of development of choral literature. Extensive rehearsal and performance are required.
 

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